Digital Essay

Digital Essay

The documents for this digital essay were created for a first year composition course, ENGL101.05 “Bot or Not: Technology, Identity, Autonomy.” The course was taught in the fall of 2015. The digital essay assignment was based on Donna Haraway’s “Cyborg Manifesto” in which she argues that we are all cyborgs. After spending a week reading and discussing Haraway’s text, the students did an in class-writing exercise where they […]

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Digital Scholarship at Bucknell: It’s About Building Relationships

Digital Scholarship at Bucknell: It’s About Building Relationships

Presentation with Matthew Gardzina at DLF: Liberal Arts College Preconference, Vancouver, BC, October 2015. A video recording of the session can be accessed here. Abstract: Charged with creating a digital humanities initiative that was innovative, intentional, and collaborative, Library and Information Technology realized that we required an inclusive approach that opened up digital scholarship to all divisions at Bucknell while emphasizing the liberal arts’ commitment […]

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#BUDSC15

#BUDSC15

The Bucknell Digital Scholarship Conference, #BUDSC15, “Collaborating Digitally: Engaging Students in Public Scholarship” took place on Nov 6-8, 2015. It was my second year co-chairing the conference. This year, I had the invaluable help of Carrie Johnston (Postdoc in Digital Scholarship) and Brianna Derr (Instructional Technologist Specializing in Video). The conference was covered by Bucknell University’s Communications Department and the Bucknellian.

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Digital Scholarship at Bucknell

Digital Scholarship at Bucknell

This post originally appeared as part of the Member Update series for the Digital Library Federation on February 23, 2015. This Member Update was provided by Param Bedi, Vice President for Library & Information Technology, Matt Gardzina, Director for Instructional Technology, and Emily Sherwood, CLIR Postdoc for Digital Scholarship, Bucknell University. At Bucknell University “Digital Scholarship” is defined as any scholarly activity that makes extensive use of […]

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RHS 2014 Graduation Speech

RHS 2014 Graduation Speech

On Tuesday, June 10, 2014, there was a shooting at Reynolds High School in Troutdale, Oregon. Emilio Hoffman, a freshman, was killed when he came upon the shooter in the locker room. PE teacher Todd Rispler was grazed by a bullet when he went to alert the rest of the school of the presence of the gunman. The gunman, also a student at Reynolds, killed himself […]

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Mural.ly in the Hybrid Classroom

Mural.ly in the Hybrid Classroom

While working on hybrid course this semester, Lisa Brundage and I experimented with forums and blog posts in order to get students to connect and discuss in an online space. Both the blog and forum worked in a limited capacity, but the students never fully engaged with each other, they simply fulfilled the assignments. When we turned to our class project–a digital companion to Margaret […]

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How to Create a Timeline

How to Create a Timeline

This post originally appeared as part of the Monthly Social Justice Topic Series on Stop-And-Frisk from JustPublics@365. Throughout this topic series, we will introduce knowledge streams and digital tools that can help you present information in engaging and meaningful ways. The Timeline JS tool used to create the Stop-and-Frisk timeline is one of these tools. Timelines allow you to craft a narrative for your audience, gather a wide range […]

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Stop-and-Frisk Timeline

Stop-and-Frisk Timeline

This post originally appeared as part of the Monthly Social Justice Topic Series on Stop-And-Frisk from JustPublics@365. This timeline illustrates some of the major moments of, responses to, and influences on Stop and Frisk dating back to Terry vs. Ohio, the 1968 Supreme Court decision to the present Federal District Court ruling on Floyd v. New York City. Collected here are important documents, reports, and films, created by the state, activists, research and community […]

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Editing Shakespeare for the Web

Editing Shakespeare for the Web

This post originally appeared in Upstart: Essays and Conversations About Early Modern English Studies, on March 29, 2013. Early Thursday morning—okay not that early, but the coffee hadn’t quite permeated my system, yet—I sat in as an auditor on Jeremy Ehrlich’s workshop on “Editing Shakespeare for the Web.” Happily for me, there were several familiar faces as participants and auditors; overall, it was a good […]

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Into the Woods

Into the Woods

This post originally appeared in A List of Things Thrown Five Minutes Ago, on July 26, 2012. The reason that reviewers wait until the end of previews to see a show is that it takes time to work out the kinks in a production. Rehearsals aren’t enough. Tech week isn’t enough. The cast and crew need practice in front of an audience. I start by […]

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